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Town Puts Three Pension Recipients Back on Payroll

Employees will receive part time salaries in addition to pensions reported to be near $100,000.

Three high-earning Town of Oyster Bay officials who took retirement buyouts and are receiving pensions in the neighborhood of $100,000 are once again on the town payroll, officials said.

A Town spokeswoman confirmed that James Byrne, who returned as Parks Commissioner, Richard Betz, who will return as Commissioner of the Department of Public Works, and Public Information Officer James Moriarity are all back on the payroll and are being paid up to $30,000 in total hourly wages.

Under state law, the three may still receive their annual pensions if they make $30,000 or less.

Byrne, Betz and Moriarty's annual pensions are $107,340, $97,387 and $99,188, Newsday [paid site] reported.

Although Jay Jacobs, the Nasau County Democratic chamber blasted the rehirings, Deputy Town Supervisor Len Genova, who also serves as Town attorney, argued it will save taxpayer money.

Prior to their retirement Byrne, Betz and Moriarty earned salaries of $150,125, $136,303 and $142,211, according to town officials. Even adding the full $30,000 to the rehired employees' pensions will cost less than if they remained on the job, Genova said.

"The rules allow this," Genova, said. "That's what people need to remember."

Genova said that between retirement incentives that were offered in 2010 and the more than 90 employees who accepted a retirement package in 2012, the Town has lost almost 20 percent of their workforce, many of whom are were longtime workers.

He said that one of the thoughts behind rehiring employees is their years on the job.

"Between them, they have about 120 combined years of experience," Genova said, adding that the employees will help "mentor" younger employees.

But Genova said there no limit has been set as to how long the employees will remain on the Town payroll. 

ed February 06, 2013 at 10:49 AM
Everyone knows if you donate a few bucks to your local GOP club you can get any family member a job with the town. Why is there no federal investigation into this corruption? Its called accepting UNLAWFUL GRATUTIES!
Joe February 06, 2013 at 12:35 PM
So this makes it right? Check out the Newsday site and see how many members of the same families are working for the town. Its not about choice's in life it NEPOTISM. And if what other have written here is true, is really seems the path to TOBAY employment is a corrupt one. No quite the same as your example. In your example a unpaid elected school board has the final say. Not the KING!
LS February 06, 2013 at 05:59 PM
If you can't get on the Newsday site because you're not a subscriber, you can go to www.seethroughNY.net. It's got pensions, salaries, expenditures, even school district information. It is a real eye-opener. Wake up, citizens!
Fed up resident February 07, 2013 at 02:49 AM
Reject Fed up resident 9:46 pm on Wednesday, February 6, 2013 Way to go Jon Venditto and Lenny Genova....keep up with your lies...it's a sad day when Jon Venditto has lost all credibility! Len Genova stated in the papers that only the 3 commissioner will be brought back. Once again, Jon Venditto's deputy supervisor makes a false statement. It has come to my attention that 2 more people who retired during the towns incentive retirement program last year have been appointed to the town of oyster bay zoning board of appeals.......part time job making over 26,000 per year with full benifits. The only question I have is how do 2 secretaries qualify for the zoning board?
OnSecondThought March 24, 2013 at 12:49 PM
$30,000 a year for 20 hours plus $100,000 pension. Are we to assume that these were parttime jobs all along??

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